What are my options?

What are my options?

There are a number of treatment options available when it comes to targeting multiple sclerosis. In order to get the right treatment for you, it’s essential that you talk to your doctor or MS nurse. They’ll be able to provide plenty of information about how you can find a treatment that is most suitable for you. To help you to prepare for these conversations, here’s some information that may help you to understand your options when it comes to disease modifying therapies (DMTs). 

Found out more about managing your MS symptoms here.

What are DMTs?

Disease modifying therapies (DMTs) are MS treatments that may help you to achieve your treatment goals. When taken as prescribed, DMTs may slow or prevent the damage MS is causing to your central nervous system (CNS). They aim to treat the underlying disease, not just the MS symptoms. But remember that treatments don’t work the same for everyone: that’s why it’s important for your doctor or MS nurse to keep track of how well they’re working.

What to consider?

There are a several things to consider when it comes to DMTs as they can differ in a number of ways. One important point is that the type of treatment that may be appropriate for you can depend on your type of MS as well as what you want from your life with multiple sclerosis. 

You may want to ask your doctor or MS nurse how your options differ in terms of:

  • How well your treatment is slowing or preventing the damage MS is causing to your brain 
  • How and when you need to take the treatment
  • The pros and cons of the treatment  
  • How they need to be stored and prepared
  • How long you need to take your treatment for
  • If you need to have any tests or be monitored 
What are my options?

There are several different DMTs for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, the vast majority of which are for relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). Your doctor or MS nurse can tell you more about your different options. 

The table below shows a range of DMTs. Like most treatments, DMTs for MS have two names. The brand name is the name given by the pharmaceutical company that makes the treatment. The generic name is the term given to the active ingredient in the treatment, which is uniform and understood globally. 

Brand name

Generic name

Dosing

Aubagio®

teriflunomide

14 mg film-coated tablets taken once daily

Avonex®

interferon beta-1a

30 mcg/1.0 ml solution for injection administered once weekly

Betaferon®

interferon beta-1b

250 mcg/ml, powder and solvent for solution for injection administered every other day

Copaxone®

glatiramer acetate

20 mg/ml solution for injection administered once daily or 40mg/ml solution for injection administered three times a week

Gilenya®

fingolimod

0.5 mg hard capsules taken once daily

Lemtrada®

alemtuzumab

12 mg concentrate for solution for infusion administered in 2 treatment courses given 12 months apart, lasting 5 days and 3 days

Novantrone®

mitoxantrone

2 mg/ml concentrate for solution for infusion administered as an infusion at a dose of 12 mg/m2 body surface, which may be repeated at 21-day intervals

Plegridy®

peginterferon beta-1a

125 micrograms solution for injection administered every 2 weeks

Rebif®

interferon beta-1a

22/44 mcg solution for injection administered three times per week

Tecfidera®

dimethyl fumarate

240 mg gastro-resistant hard capsules taken twice daily

Tysabri®

natalizumab

300 mg concentrate for solution for infusion administered once monthly

 

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